Southern York County Sentinel

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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Development struggles in southern York County

Reference the article in the York Dispatch available here: http://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/local/2016/01/26/developer-sewer-stalls-southern-york-county-growth/78959204/

The article, which is above average for such coverage of southern York County, requires more information with which understand the situation. It has changed in at least 20 years. Elected officials have come and gone, but their misunderstanding of the issues continues unchanged.



The article describes the longtime efforts of a local developer to bring commercial and industrial development to the region. This development offsets some of the negative effects of the headlong housing development that has taken place here. 

First of all, the development at Exit 4, I-83, does not involve “wall-to-wall” houses but instead commercial development creating jobs and shopping opportunities for area residents.

Second of all, the property taxes thereby generated help to slow the rise of school property taxes for all citizens of the area whether they live in the township or in any of the boroughs that comprise the school district.

The area of the commercial development has long been so zoned because that is the highest and best use of the land. Attempts by township supervisors and others to stop the development, whether by denying the sewer capacity or by imposing ridiculous environmental regulations, does an awful disservice to the people and taxpayers of the region and their own municipalities.
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Monday, July 6, 2015

Pennsylvania Ping Pong

I think the Capitolwire piece (see below) is right on. I've said for a long time now that the legislature plays a cynical ping pong game in which one house passes a bill in one session knowing the other house will not. Then, in the next session, the houses switch sides. This allows representatives to make claims out of both sides of their mouths.

Now that we have a political split between the administration and legislature, they can now play the same game on a bigger ping pong table.

Meanwhile, the commonwealth will remain mired in the economic Dark Ages.

Both sides of the table served budgets that were deeply flawed. Wolf's budget was grossly expensive and threw money at a problem for which money is not the solution: education. The Republicans served a budget that simply kicked a tax increase down the road while more debt piled up around the commonwealth.

A pox on all their houses.


Some discount GOP�s legislative victories on liquor, pensions. Last week, one favorite topic of conversation amongst state Capitol observers focused on what former Gov. Tom Corbett must be thinking as the Republican-controlled Legislature managed to pass not just a liquor privatization bill but also a measure to alter Pennsylvania�s state pension plans. Corbett had four years, albeit with slimmer GOP majorities, and could get neither accomplished; Tom Wolf gets elected governor, and just like that, the House and Senate are one big happy family passing stuff that most believed could never get through the General Assembly. Well, The Associated Press writes about one potential reason offered by some for the GOP�s legislative successes: enough Republicans who would have otherwise voted against the liquor and pension bills expected them to get vetoed by Wolf, so their vote for the legislation didn�t matter. CLICK HERE to read more about that line of reasoning. And, certainly, the liquor bill was vetoed last week by Wolf (CLICK HERE to read Capitolwire Staff Writer Kevin Zwick�s story from Thursday), and it�s more than likely he vetoes the pension bill this week (maybe today). But as a few longtime Capitol denizens pointed out to Capitolwire during discussions about why the bills passed, members are still responsible for their votes, and they are still on the record as supporting those measures (if they voted for them), and that�s never easy to explain away, particularly by saying, �I voted for it because I knew it would be vetoed.� That�s not something too many politicians are going to be comfortable saying publicly... just some food for thought.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

DEBATE CANCELLED!

They apologize but the club couldn't find a time when all candidates could attend.

The presentation on heroin use  in York County is still on for May 21st.

Monday, April 20, 2015

SYC Republican Club hosting a meet the candidates evening in Shrewsbury Township

It's official. The SYC Republican Club has arranged to hold a Meet the Republican Board Candidates Night at the Shrewsbury Township Building at 11505 Susquehanna Trail South on Tuesday, April 28, at 7 PM.

The four Republican candidates who filed petitions were invited and three will be attending: David Brose, Jim Coyle and Arthur Rutledge.

The public will be allowed to ask questions. Below is a list we hope all candidates will have a chance to answer.

1. Why do you want to be a Shrewsbury Township Supervisor? 
2. What do you think are the key qualifications of a township supervisor, and why do you think you qualify? 
3. What areas do you want to concentrate on and why? 
4. Do you have the time to make all meetings and do extra duties that come up? 
5. Are you aware that the job entails much more than showing for monthly meetings? Do you intend to learn township governance? Attend conferences and other learning experiences? Read the state's Municipalities Planning Code and Townships of the Second Class Code? Familiarize yourself with township ordinances especially the zoning and land development ordinances? 
6. Do you have any conflicts of interest? 
7. Do support user fees in lieu of taxes or not. Why? 
8. Are you aware that housing development is the costliest development, that commercial development actually helps hold down taxes for the entire community? If elected, would you support more commercial development in Shrewsbury Township? 
9. Are you aware that the township has a tax exempt conservation fund? If elected, would you support using it to preserve farmland and open space?

Monday, April 6, 2015

Meet the Candidates

The Southern York County Republican Club is attempting to bring together the four Republican candidates for the Shrewsbury Township Board of Supervisors for a public question and answers session. The meeting would be held in the Shrewsbury Township Building before the May 19th Primary.

Campaign literature and letters to the editor understandably present only the good side of candidates. York County media pays little or no attention to local elections, and if they do pay attention, they skew one way or another.

The only good way to get to know a candidate is to be able to see them and talk to them and ask them the tough questions. Questions such as:

1. Why do you want to be a Shrewsbury Township Supervisor?
2. What do you think are the key qualifications of a township supervisor, and why do you think you qualify?
3. What areas do you want to concentrate on and why?
4. Do you have the time to make all meetings and do extra duties that come up?
5. Are you aware that the job entails much more than showing for monthly meetings? Do you intend to learn township governance? Attend conferences and other learning experiences? Read the state's Municipalities Planning Code and Townships of the Second Class Code? Familiarize yourself with township ordinances especially the zoning and land development ordinances?
6. Do you have any conflicts of interest?
7. Do you believe in users' taxes?

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